Archive for the ‘Piffle’ Category

Le Guin crossover the 2nd   Leave a comment

Some time ago I observed a commonality between Le Guin’s “Omelas” and “The Beast Below.” Now, having just finished “Tehanu,” #4 in Le Guin’s Earthsea series, I’ve got another one.

In “Tehanu,” the wizard Ged is a secondary character. He arrives in the story fresh from losing his magic – magic he’s possessed since childhood, magic that has defined him all his life – in a battle to save his world and all its people. Without it, he no longer knows who he is, or what purpose remains for him. Wizard was everything to him; now, he has nothing.

I was reminded of the Metacrisis Doctor, sent off to live with Rose in Pete’s World – particularly, in a series of stories I wrote when the official version ran out.

The Metacrisis Doctor is a secondary character. He appears in the story having been split off from his Time Lord self – a self he’s been for 900 years, a heritage that has defined him – in a battle to save the multiverse and all its people. Human, he no longer knows who he is, or what purpose remains for him. Time Lord was everything to him; now, he has nothing.

But the man’s idea of himself is limited. Ged learns, as the Doctor must, that he is more than his magic. He still has his heart: his passion for teaching and learning, his goodness, his love for his people. Though the Metacrisis Doctor’s story stopped when he was left behind on Pete’s World, fans know that he too must come to terms with his new reality. He must find that he is more than his TARDIS and his extra heart. He still has his brilliance, his curiosity, his drive. Like Ged, he laments his loss – but in the end discovers a whole new life he never imagined before.

Like Ged, the Doctor is brought back to himself by the grounded, sensible, passionate love of a woman, and the real world in which she needs him.

They stand together on the beach
their last link with the old world
the old life
fading into mist
into nothing
gone.
She stares, empty
at a loss
her heart torn
he takes her hand.

Who is this man?
this man, this living man
not a dream or a spirit or a fantasy
not the one you pined for, the one that could never be
but solid and real
and loving you.
She looks into his eyes, questing
is this who you are?
do you love me
and can I love you?
Can we leave behind that old life
create something new here together?
can it be done?
He pulls her close, clutching, desperate
gods I hope so.

What now? they ask
as hand in hand they leave the empty shore behind
the old life, the past but a memory
a fantasy
as unreal as if it had never happened.
A new existence breaks in through their daze
a world of taxis and trains
cities
miles across the continent
home.
Can this be right?
The years since she met him
since she lost him
a blur
She casts a glance
again and again
each time startled to find him there
beside her
distant and sad but there
real
bittersweet.
Can this really be?
She leads him, gingerly
uncertain
into her family home
the family and the home so different
from the one she knew for nearly twenty years
yet somehow right.
Now strange again
with this new man beside her
clinging to her hand.
Safe inside she turns to him.
Can this be real?
Can you be?
Is it true, the words you said
the words I so wanted to hear
as if wishing made them so
did you mean them?
were they real?
The truth afire in his eyes
the love he had so long denied
the passion, newly aroused
his blood ablaze as blood ne’er burned in him before.

Too much to adjust to
this sudden need for sleep
and food
and you.
A whole new world
emotions
sensations
a body so alien, so strange.
Slowly I learn
what it must be like
to be you
how hard it is
to feel so much
by this body
betrayed
victim to all its whims.
Is this what it is
to be human?
a constant struggle
a fight for dominance
control
of my own self
letting go, a challenge
impossibly difficult
so much more than I ever imagined
so much more than I can take.
I watch you sleep
envy you your peacefulness
your ignorance of any other way
pining for my own lethe
begone, the memory of immortality
the constance of that extra heart.
But then you turn to me
with your deep brown eyes and smile
gloriously
a world of sensation overcomes
drowns me
I am lost
the joy of your smile
the intoxication of your touch.
Is this what it is
to be human?
new heights of pleasure
to balance the pain
Is this how you endure
day by day, so gray
so brief and all alone
and then, all of a sudden
resplendent color
beyond description.
No wonder you loved that life so much!
No wonder you grieve
I grieve for you
your loss as well as mine
your brief and minute world exploded
and then shrunk again to nothing.
I think finally I may know
what that is
how it feels
color, and then blackness
vision, blindness
love and loss

humanity.

Transition, https://elisabethflaum.wordpress.com/2012/02/16/transition/, 2/16/2012

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Posted May 9, 2018 by Elisabeth in Piffle

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The Doctor and the lawyer   Leave a comment

Recently it came to light that there may have been some conflict over use of the name Lethbridge-Stewart in the most recent Christmas special. While the parties involved downplay any kerfuffle, it brings to mind the odd status of many of Doctor Who‘s most beloved inventions, as described in this post shared by a lawyer friend:

The Strange Copyright of Doctor Who

The Daleks are of course the most famous example of shared ownership between the show and a writer: Terry Nation and his estate pushed for Dalek spinoffs, held up novelization of Dalek episodes, blocked several of those episodes from streaming on Britbox, and very nearly prevented the Daleks’ return to the show in 2005. But they are not the only ones. Kit Pedler and Gerry Davis, both deceased, are credited on every appearance of the Cybermen. The son of writer Anthony Coburn recently demanded credit and compensation for his father’s alleged invention of the TARDIS. Now, the Brigadier joins the parade.

On the other hand are the unsung, uncredited, uncompensated BBC employees behind these creations and many others. Delia Derbyshire, an employee of the BBC Radiophonic Workshop, was denied ownership of her most famous contribution – the arrangement of Ron Grainer’s theme – and was credited only on the 50th Anniversary Special. Raymond Cusick, the mind behind the Daleks’ iconic look, has none of the control or compensation Terry Nation and his family have enjoyed. And who did design the TARDIS interior, some invisible employee suggested in An Adventure in Space and Time but unsung even today?

As mentioned in the post above, the TARDIS itself has been a point of contention between the BBC and the London Metropolitan Police. Unfortunately, that body waited too long to lay claim to their famous Police Box: by the time they came forward, the box belonged firmly in the minds of the public to Doctor Who.

Other entities may own a share of the Daleks, the Cybermen, or the Brigadier – but that doesn’t make them less a part of Doctor Who.

 

Posted January 30, 2018 by Elisabeth in Piffle

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Oops.   Leave a comment

Peter Capaldi and Pearl Mackie are coming to my town, and I have a previous commitment.

Time to make some alternate arrangements…

sshhh2bbanner

Be ready.

Posted August 24, 2017 by Elisabeth in Piffle

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How does he do it?   Leave a comment

We’ve been through a lot of Moffat season arcs by now. Some of them have been meh; some of them have been really terrible. At least one has even been amazing, but we know better than to expect it.

That expectation is key.

My husband and I both sat on the edge of our seats throughout “World Enough and Time.” The reveal of Simm’s Master blew our minds. (I saw it coming about 1 min before, my husband about 10sec.) Cyber-Bill broke our hearts. And Nardole – Nardole! Running away! I haven’t thought that much of him over the course of the season but somehow I knew him for no coward.

As a result, anticipation for this week was high. But we’ve been burned plenty before. Even after everything we’ve been through with this Doctor, we just didn’t know what to expect. We braced ourselves for disappointment. And when we didn’t get it – when instead we got everything we never knew we wanted and more – the reward is just that much sweeter.

He doesn’t have to be that good; just better than we expect. And then, when he IS good, he just seems that much greater.

Let’s keep going out on top. 🙂

Posted July 3, 2017 by Elisabeth in Piffle, Season 10, Writers and Writing

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PS   Leave a comment

MISSY.

Is she genuinely remorseful? I doubt it. Can she make a lasting change? Ditto. She will give the Doctor what he wants, right up until the moment she is free. Will she make an unexpected choice, in opposition to herself for once?

Quite possibly.

Gomez is magic under any circumstances. I’m heartbroken she won’t return after this series. I can’t wait to see her chew scenery with John Simm. When this is all over I’m rewatching every Green Wing and DW scene of hers in a row.

Every little thing…

Posted June 7, 2017 by Elisabeth in Guest stars, Piffle

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It’s official:   Leave a comment

All 26 seasons of Classic Doctor Who are now streaming.

It’s about what we expected: the BBC launching their own streaming service and making it the exclusive home of Doctor Who. It’s been in the works ever since they pulled the show from other streaming services. It took them long enough; I wonder if the wait had the desired effect, if desperate fans are buying the service, or if they’ve all given up by now.

Me, I’m buying it.

I’ve known about the service for a while. My sister is buying it for the infinite supply of Midsomer Murders and similar cozy fare. I was holding out for DW – and I told them so in one of their many surveys. Now – although I think it was the plan all along, and not a result of my pestering – I’ve got what I wanted.

Several informational articles mention 20 episodes for which Britbox could not secure the rights. From my research it appears that these are some of the lesser known Dalek episodes – “Genesis of the Daleks” is available, “Day of the Daleks” featuring the Third Doctor is not. The Nation estate strikes again?

Of course the missing episodes are not available, nor the newly-released animated “Power of the Daleks.” However the found stories “Enemy of the World” and “Web of Fear” are there, including Web’s animated third episode.

More, I expect, is to come.

Posted April 6, 2017 by Elisabeth in Piffle

The Doctor’s Big Love   Leave a comment

The Verity! Podcast on “The Girl in the Fireplace” brought up an idea that I had never seriously considered in the context of Doctor Who, but which is clearly relevant: polyamory, or the ability to love more than one.

American society is fixedly monogamous. Any type of relationship veering from the man-woman-marriage-children prototype gets a raised eyebrow at best, violent discrimination at worst. “Soul mates” are a trope many people attempt to apply to real life, often with painful results. Yet many people love more than once. The widowed or divorced person who remarries doesn’t (necessarily) stop loving their original partner. A person may love a long string or collection of people, each one different and unique.

It may not have been intentional on the part of either showrunner, but modern Who definitely pushes the boundaries.

In “The Girl in the Fireplace” (and in real life) Reinette is a married woman who is lover to the King. In the story she also falls in love with the Doctor. In her world of eighteenth century France, this is normal, as the Doctor tries to explain to his companions. But it’s also normal in the Doctor’s world. The Doctor loves Rose, but he also loves Sarah Jane. The Doctor marries River, but he also mourns Clara. The Doctor loves the TARDIS, but he equally loves his companions. The Doctor had a family once: does he ever stop loving them?

In a long life one may love many times, or many people all at once. Love for one isn’t diminished by love for another. The Doctor has two hearts and dozens of lifetimes: it seems natural that he would love a lot. It seems natural too that anyone of his courage, compassion, and charm would be easy to love. (All of us have fallen for him, right?) And in this world, can too much love really be a bad thing?

All it takes is a big enough heart(s).

Posted February 11, 2017 by Elisabeth in Commentary, Companions, Piffle, Speculation, Themes and Ideas

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